They Call Us Bruce – Episode 38: They Call Us Pulitzer

Jeff Yang and Phil Yu present an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America.

What's up, podcast listeners? We've got another episode of our podcast They Call Us Bruce. Each week, my good friend, writer/columnist Jeff Yang and I host an unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asian America, with a strong focus on media, entertainment and popular culture.

On this episode, we welcome journalism student Mariel Padilla, who, at 23 years old, just won a Pulitzer Prize for her role in The Cincinnati Enquirer's coverage documenting Cincinnati's heroin epidemic.

Read more »

Advertisements

How A Migration Lawyer Can Help You With Visa Applications

Applying for an Australian visa can be daunting and that’s why a DBH Migration Lawyer can help make the process less stressful.

In Australia, there are six classes of visas however each class contains numerous subclasses that need to be considered. Working and Skilled visas, as well as Family and Spousal visas, contain 22 subclasses making them complex, text-heavy documents for a person to navigate. The Migration Act 1958 also needs to be understood if you or your family are considering migration to Australia.

Your unique circumstances will determine which type of visa you should apply for, but it can be difficult to interpret and understand the many laws involved.

  • There are many questions that arise:
  • What type of visa should I apply for?
  • How do I apply?
  • Which fees do I need to pay?
  • What are my visa entitlements?

To ensure your visa application has a successful outcome, you should seek the help of a professional help Migration Lawyer. A Migration Lawyer can also be called a Registered Migration Agent and their greater understanding of such a complex area of law will allow you to rest assured that your visa application will be considered.

What does an Immigration Lawyer do?

A Migration Lawyer can assist with your application for an Australian visa and alleviate any associated stress. A Migration Lawyer has experience in preparing documentation correctly and will provide you with legal advice and support.

A Migration Lawyer will provide honest, comprehensive advice about any applicable fees or costs you may be required to pay when applying for a visa. They will liaise with the Department of Immigration and Border Protection on your behalf so that you need not worry about to ensure your application has the best chance of being successful.

The benefits of hiring a Migration lawyer

With so many different visas available, the process of applying can be difficult and disheartening. A Migration Lawyer can help you to understand the application, will answer your questions and guide you from start to finish.

Specialist knowledge and expertise

Migration law is complicated; (the Migration Act 1958 needs to be considered if you or your family want to migrate to Australia). A DBH Migration Lawyer can seamlessly navigate Australia’s ever-changing migration laws and help you find solutions to any challenges during the application process.

Save time, money and stress

Hiring a professional will help you streamline your visa application process with their expert knowledge and experience. Migration Lawyers know the rules and regulations that must be considered when applying for a visa and can advise you on the best course of action to take during each part of the process. A visa application is time-consuming, but a Migration Lawyer can help reduce delays by liaising with various authorities on your behalf and ensuring your application is completed accurately and efficiently.

A higher chance of success

Visa eligibility requests are very specific and strict; mishandling or failing to comply with any requirements can lead to your application being rejected. The chances of having your visa approved are much higher when you have Migration Lawyer to advise you through the entire process.

A migration lawyer will provide you with sound advice and prepare a solid case for your application, reducing the chance of your application being unsuccessful.

How do I find a Migration Lawyer?

Duncan Basheer Hannon’s Registered Migration Lawyers will guide you through your visa application process, from start to finish.

DBH can help you find the right visa for your circumstances and assist you in completing the application with a greater chance of success. DBH provide clear, comprehensive legal advice on how to complete your application, which fees you might be required to pay and what your entitlements may be. A DBH Migration Lawyer can answer any questions you have about the visa application process.

DBH can also provide advice on related areas of law, such as complex spousal visas and other family law matters, as well as commercial law if you’re migrating your business to Australia.

If you’re looking for help with visa applications, free call Duncan Basheer Hannon on 1800 324 324. Not ready to call? That’s OK, ask a question online here and we will get back to you via email.

The post How A Migration Lawyer Can Help You With Visa Applications appeared first on Duncan Basheer Hannon Lawyers.

The Crazy Rich Asians trailer is here. And you are not ready.

"The only thing crazier than love is family."

Here we go. Who said there are no Asian American movie stars? After teasing us with a juicy sliver of footage last week, the full official trailer for Crazy Rich Asians has finally dropped. And it is hot damn glorious.

If you haven't heard about this movie, you will. Based on the bestselling novel by Kevin Kwan, and directed by Jon M. Chu, the contemporary fish-out-of-water romantic comedy is the first major Hollywood studio movie featuring an all-Asian cast in over 25 years. And judging from the trailer, it's going to be a blast.

Fresh Off The Boat's Constance Wu stars as Rachel Chu, a Chinese American economics professor who accompanies her longtime boyfriend, Nick Young (newcomer Henry Golding), to his best friend's wedding in Singapore. But she soon learns that Nick has neglected to mention a few key details about his life. Not only is his family impossibly wealthy, he's perhaps the most eligible bachelor in Asia, and every single woman in his ultra-rarefied social class is incredibly jealous of Rachel and wants to bring her down.

Check it out:

Read more »

Read These Blogs


Meet the journalism student who found out she won a Pulitzer in class
23-year-old Mariel Padilla, a grad student at Columbia Journalism School, won a Pulitzer for her reporting on the opioid epidemic for The Cincinatti Enquirer. In addition to helping to write “Seven Days of Heroin,” Padilla created a much-needed database for better coverage of the crisis.

* * *
1965 to Today: Moving Towards a Majority-Minority America
With the Trump Administration’s eye on xenophobic immigration policies, America’s family-based, legal immigration system — the one that shaped Alton Wang’s family — is under attack.

* * *
‘No job, no money’: Life in Vietnam for immigrants deported by U.S.
Despite a bilateral agreement that Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in the U.S. prior to 1995, many of this population have been deported. Many deportees say adjusting to life in Vietnam has been difficult, especially since they are viewed with suspicion by Vietnamese officials and have trouble finding work.

* * *
Why Your Mother Can’t Drive
“Your mother can’t drive because when all her high school friends were getting permits, she was an undocumented teen with a MetroCard but no I.D.” Cinelle Barnes on intergenerational trauma and growing up undocumented.

* * *
Here’s Why You’ve Never Heard Of The Titanic’s Chinese Survivors
Wait, what?! A century ago, a racist press either muddied or completely ignored the names of Chinese survivors of the fatal Titanic voyage — part of the reason why you’ve probably never heard about these people.

* * *
From Internment Camps to Souped-Up Chevys: The Rise of Nikkei Car Clubs
Oliver Wang looks at Nikkei car clubs of ’50s and ’60s L.A. — comprised of Japanese American teens who either had families who had been incarcerated during World War II, or had been incarcerated themselves.

* * *
BuzzFeed’s Eugene Lee Yang Mixes Humor With Social Commentary
Filmmaker Eugene Lee Yang is a breakout internet star from the popular video series “The Try Guys.”

<!–//<![CDATA[ var m3_u = (location.protocol=='https:'?'https://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;:'http://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;); var m3_r = Math.floor(Math.random()*99999999999); if (!document.MAX_used) document.MAX_used = ','; document.write ("”); //]]>–>

Read These Blogs


Meet the journalism student who found out she won a Pulitzer in class
23-year-old Mariel Padilla, a grad student at Columbia Journalism School, won a Pulitzer for her reporting on the opioid epidemic for The Cincinatti Enquirer. In addition to helping to write “Seven Days of Heroin,” Padilla created a much-needed database for better coverage of the crisis.

* * *
1965 to Today: Moving Towards a Majority-Minority America
With the Trump Administration’s eye on xenophobic immigration policies, America’s family-based, legal immigration system — the one that shaped Alton Wang’s family — is under attack.

* * *
‘No job, no money’: Life in Vietnam for immigrants deported by U.S.
Despite a bilateral agreement that Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in the U.S. prior to 1995, many of this population have been deported. Many deportees say adjusting to life in Vietnam has been difficult, especially since they are viewed with suspicion by Vietnamese officials and have trouble finding work.

* * *
Why Your Mother Can’t Drive
“Your mother can’t drive because when all her high school friends were getting permits, she was an undocumented teen with a MetroCard but no I.D.” Cinelle Barnes on intergenerational trauma and growing up undocumented.

* * *
Here’s Why You’ve Never Heard Of The Titanic’s Chinese Survivors
Wait, what?! A century ago, a racist press either muddied or completely ignored the names of Chinese survivors of the fatal Titanic voyage — part of the reason why you’ve probably never heard about these people.

* * *
From Internment Camps to Souped-Up Chevys: The Rise of Nikkei Car Clubs
Oliver Wang looks at Nikkei car clubs of ’50s and ’60s L.A. — comprised of Japanese American teens who either had families who had been incarcerated during World War II, or had been incarcerated themselves.

* * *
BuzzFeed’s Eugene Lee Yang Mixes Humor With Social Commentary
Filmmaker Eugene Lee Yang is a breakout internet star from the popular video series “The Try Guys.”

<!–//<![CDATA[ var m3_u = (location.protocol=='https:'?'https://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;:'http://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;); var m3_r = Math.floor(Math.random()*99999999999); if (!document.MAX_used) document.MAX_used = ','; document.write ("”); //]]>–>

Read These Blogs


Meet the journalism student who found out she won a Pulitzer in class
23-year-old Mariel Padilla, a grad student at Columbia Journalism School, won a Pulitzer for her reporting on the opioid epidemic for The Cincinatti Enquirer. In addition to helping to write “Seven Days of Heroin,” Padilla created a much-needed database for better coverage of the crisis.

* * *
1965 to Today: Moving Towards a Majority-Minority America
With the Trump Administration’s eye on xenophobic immigration policies, America’s family-based, legal immigration system — the one that shaped Alton Wang’s family — is under attack.

* * *
‘No job, no money’: Life in Vietnam for immigrants deported by U.S.
Despite a bilateral agreement that Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in the U.S. prior to 1995, many of this population have been deported. Many deportees say adjusting to life in Vietnam has been difficult, especially since they are viewed with suspicion by Vietnamese officials and have trouble finding work.

* * *
Why Your Mother Can’t Drive
“Your mother can’t drive because when all her high school friends were getting permits, she was an undocumented teen with a MetroCard but no I.D.” Cinelle Barnes on intergenerational trauma and growing up undocumented.

* * *
Here’s Why You’ve Never Heard Of The Titanic’s Chinese Survivors
Wait, what?! A century ago, a racist press either muddied or completely ignored the names of Chinese survivors of the fatal Titanic voyage — part of the reason why you’ve probably never heard about these people.

* * *
From Internment Camps to Souped-Up Chevys: The Rise of Nikkei Car Clubs
Oliver Wang looks at Nikkei car clubs of ’50s and ’60s L.A. — comprised of Japanese American teens who either had families who had been incarcerated during World War II, or had been incarcerated themselves.

* * *
BuzzFeed’s Eugene Lee Yang Mixes Humor With Social Commentary
Filmmaker Eugene Lee Yang is a breakout internet star from the popular video series “The Try Guys.”

<!–//<![CDATA[ var m3_u = (location.protocol=='https:'?'https://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;:'http://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;); var m3_r = Math.floor(Math.random()*99999999999); if (!document.MAX_used) document.MAX_used = ','; document.write ("”); //]]>–>

Read These Blogs


Meet the journalism student who found out she won a Pulitzer in class
23-year-old Mariel Padilla, a grad student at Columbia Journalism School, won a Pulitzer for her reporting on the opioid epidemic for The Cincinatti Enquirer. In addition to helping to write “Seven Days of Heroin,” Padilla created a much-needed database for better coverage of the crisis.

* * *
1965 to Today: Moving Towards a Majority-Minority America
With the Trump Administration’s eye on xenophobic immigration policies, America’s family-based, legal immigration system — the one that shaped Alton Wang’s family — is under attack.

* * *
‘No job, no money’: Life in Vietnam for immigrants deported by U.S.
Despite a bilateral agreement that Vietnamese immigrants who arrived in the U.S. prior to 1995, many of this population have been deported. Many deportees say adjusting to life in Vietnam has been difficult, especially since they are viewed with suspicion by Vietnamese officials and have trouble finding work.

* * *
Why Your Mother Can’t Drive
“Your mother can’t drive because when all her high school friends were getting permits, she was an undocumented teen with a MetroCard but no I.D.” Cinelle Barnes on intergenerational trauma and growing up undocumented.

* * *
Here’s Why You’ve Never Heard Of The Titanic’s Chinese Survivors
Wait, what?! A century ago, a racist press either muddied or completely ignored the names of Chinese survivors of the fatal Titanic voyage — part of the reason why you’ve probably never heard about these people.

* * *
From Internment Camps to Souped-Up Chevys: The Rise of Nikkei Car Clubs
Oliver Wang looks at Nikkei car clubs of ’50s and ’60s L.A. — comprised of Japanese American teens who either had families who had been incarcerated during World War II, or had been incarcerated themselves.

* * *
BuzzFeed’s Eugene Lee Yang Mixes Humor With Social Commentary
Filmmaker Eugene Lee Yang is a breakout internet star from the popular video series “The Try Guys.”

<!–//<![CDATA[ var m3_u = (location.protocol=='https:'?'https://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;:'http://angryasianman.com/revive/revive-adserver-3.0.5/www/delivery/ajs.php&#039;); var m3_r = Math.floor(Math.random()*99999999999); if (!document.MAX_used) document.MAX_used = ','; document.write ("”); //]]>–>